Mythology

Raavan – Enemy of Aryavarta

Heroes or Villains, no books are worth a pick-and-read unless they are intriguing. Amish Tripathi, the master storyteller of the Shiva Trilogy, Ram and Sita offers us with his latest offering Raavan – Enemy of Aryavarta. And boy, he simply doesn’t seem to lose his winning streak. (Touchwood.) We have read various versions of Raavan like from the perspective of Ashok Banker, Anand Neelkanthan, Kavita Kane. We have seen him through B.

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Menaka’s Choice

First things first. Kavita Kane, the author who previously penned Karna’s Wife and Sita’s Sister deserves a huge round of applause for her latest book Menaka’s Choice. If you assume that this book too, talks from a feminist’s point of view then you may need to read the book and correct yourself. This book is as much about men as about the women involved in this story. The protagonist Menaka is not just an enchantress apsara (heavenly nymph) who is treated as an object of lust.

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Ajaya: The Rise of Kali (Epic of the Kaurava Clan, #2)

A wise man once said, “There are three versions of a story – the winner’s version, the loser’s version and the truth.” However, what happens when we read the winner’s and the loser’s version? Who is telling the truth? Whom do we believe? Another wise man once said, “Truth is stranger than fiction.” Sometimes, even fiction seems more believable than the truth. Anand Neelakantan, even though he said that his book is a work of fiction, successfully questions the beliefs of the readers of Mahabharata.

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Ajaya: Roll of the Dice (Epic of the Kaurava clan, #1)

Most of us already know about Mahabharata. Being an Indian, one can assume that we know the plots of Ramayana, Bhagvad Gita and Mahabharata by birth. Speaking about Mahabharata, the epic consists of more than 100,000 verses or shlokas. The shlokas are in the form of stories and sub-stories that in turn, form the crux of the plot. Now, most of us have read Mahabharata from the point of view of the victors, The Pandavas.

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Sita’s Sister

There is something intriguing about Kavita Kane, the author of Sita’s Sister, her second book after the bestseller Karna’s Wife. A hardcore feminist, as her writings depict, she somehow manages to keep her readers glued to the contents of her book. If Karna’s Wife speaks about the life of Uruvi then Sita’s Sister has Urmila as the protagonist. How often have we read Ramayana? How often have we heard about Rama, Lakshman and Sita?

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Scion Of Ikshvaku

Generally, a person goes through two kinds of emotions, once he has finished reading the book. Dammit! Why did I waste my time reading this book? Dammit! Why did this book end so early? When will the next book release? What happens next? Honestly, I am one of those who belong to the second lot. I have this same set of questions in my mind.

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Finders, Keepers

A question runs across my mind. What is it with engineers and writing? Almost every author whom I follow comes from an engineering or an MBA background, may it be few of my favourites Ashwin Sanghi, Amish Tripathi or other authors like Christopher C. Doyle, Chetan Bhagat and so on. Coming back to the book, I had come across the concept of Nine Unknown Men in one of the books The Mahabharat Secret written by Christopher C.

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Karna’s Wife

What do I write about this book? As the title suggests, this book is from the perspective of Karna’s second wife, Uruvi, the princess of Pukeya. Pardon me for not having the map of Aryavrata (Bharata) at disposal. I realize that a map helps a lot to check Hastinapur and other surrounding kingdoms. Coming back to the book, it highlights Karna from a different perspective, through the eyes of his second wife Uruvi, the first one being Vrushali.

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Asura: Tale of the Vanquished

Ravana starts off this one with a punch: “For thousands of years, I have been vilified and my death is celebrated year after year in every corner of India. Why? Was it because I challenged the Gods for the sake of my daughter? Was it because I freed a race from the yoke of caste-based Deva rule? You have heard the victor’s tale, the Ramayana. Now hear the Ravanayana, for I am Ravana, the Asura, and my story is the tale of the vanquished.

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